How to Train an Abused Dog

Dogs that have been abused may become anxious, depressed, inactive, or distrustful. Although not all dogs are fearful or shy, abuse can cause a dog to be hesitant around people. It takes time to help an abused dog overcome its past.

However, they can be adopted by the right person and become loving pets. You will likely want to train a dog you have rescued from abuse. You must ensure your dog’s safety and health before you can train it. You will then be able to housebreak your dog and teach him basic commands.

Part 1: Teaching your dog to trust you

Allow your dog to adjust to its new surroundings.

Expect the dog to be anxious and upset when you bring it home for the first time. Even if your home is well-equipped, don’t force the dog to explore. You can bring the dog into a safe, comfortable space in your home, such as an alcove in the living room. The dog will soon become familiar with your home. You may become more comfortable in your home and learn to live in it.

  • You can leave your dog alone if you feel it is best. If it does not adjust, you can still sit with the dog in the same room. You don’t want your dog to feel overwhelmed or overpowered.
  • Give treats to the dog and calmly praise them.
  • When the dog adjusts, don’t stare at it or make sudden movements. Keeping a quiet environment reduces the volume of music and TV. Dogs may be scared by sudden, loud movements or staring.
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Acclimate your dog to your presence if it is afraid of you.

Dogs that have been abused are often afraid of strangers. Sitting in the same room as the dog can help them get to know you. Talk to your dog occasionally in a calm and loving tone. Move closer to the dog until he is comfortable.

  • Do not touch the dog’s head when you pet it. Instead, let your dog sniff your hand. If they are willing to allow you to, gently stroke their jaws. Stop petting the dog if it becomes withdrawn or leaves the room.
  • Don’t hug the dog or wrap your arms around it until you feel completely at ease. This could be interpreted by the dog as aggression.
  • Once your dog starts to feel comfortable around you, show it lots of love.

 

Give your dog positive experiences

Through having fun together, you can show your dog that abusers can have a positive relationship. Take your dog on walks, play with it, and pet it. You should avoid activities that could trigger past abuse.

  • Dogs may enjoy being brushed. Be gentle and slow with your dog.
  • It’s fine if your dog doesn’t enjoy playing. Spending time with your dog will make him more open to training.

There are triggers for your dog to respond.

Dogs have their own triggers. For example, they may be afraid of the mailman. However, an abused dog is likely to have more triggers. Avoid these triggers. These are some of the most common triggers for dogs that have been abused:

  • sudden movement
  • Yelling.
  • loud noises.
  • They use phrases they hear from their abusers.
  • threatening gestures
  • Gently touch the area where the dog was hurt.
  • Raising weapons-grade items
  • Use loud or deep voices to communicate with the dog.
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There are triggers for your dog to respond.

Dogs have triggers. For example, they may be afraid of the mailman. However, an abused dog is likely to have more triggers. Avoid these triggers. These are some of the most common triggers for dogs that have been abused:

  • sudden movement
  • Yelling.
  • loud noises.
  • They use phrases they hear from their abusers.
  • threatening gestures
  • You can touch the dog where it is hurt.
  • Raising weapons-grade items
  • Use loud or deep voices to communicate with the dog.

If your dog snaps at you or growls, you should contact a behaviorist or dog trainer.

Dogs that have been abused may be very fearful and more likely to bite. Professional help is needed if your dog starts to growl, snap, or run away from you. For help, contact a certified animal behaviorist, veterinarian, or dog trainer.

  • A scared dog will show signs such as heavy panting, excessive urination, and whining.
  • Never leave your child unattended with a fearful dog. The dog might bite the child.

 

Part 2: How to Housebreak an Abused Dog

Use a schedule.

Your dog must be taken out for a walk every day to relieve itself. You might take your dog to the bathroom after you get up, after lunch, and before you go to bed.

  • Dogs should be taken out at least 3 to 5 times per day. Dogs that are smaller and less active than larger breeds require more walking. Your dog may need to go outside more often if it has been abused. If your dog is outside, make sure you keep it on a leash.
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Don’t punish your dog for having accidents.

The dog will not understand your anger if it walks away from an accident. You risk inducing the dog to yell at you or putting its nose in your face.

  • Clean up any mess quickly. To get rid of the smell, make sure you use an enzyme cleaning agent (available in most pet shops) to clean up the area.
  • Don’t yell at, punish, or threaten an abusive dog.

Catch and take your dog outside to have an accident.

To get your dog’s attention, you can make a “whoops” sound like “whoops” if they are in an accident. Take the dog outside and let it finish.

  • You don’t want the dog to be triggered by this. Keep your voice calm and use one non-threatening word every time this happens.
  • You may get urine and feces from this.

Praise your dog for not having any accidents.

Give the dog a treat if it waits patiently outside. It should be praised with praises such as “Good dog” or “Boy, you did a great job!”